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PBP Fridays: E is for the Earth Father

PBP Fridays: E is for the Earth Father

Geb (left) and Heru (Horus, right)Hail to You, Geb, Earth Father!
Black as fertile soil,
the world is Your body
and the green growing things which sustain us
are Your gifts to all life.

Hail to You, Geb, Earth Father!
Husband of the Sky,
You reach ever upwards to Her
with Your mountain peaks jutting
into Her lowest whorls of clouds.

Hail to You, Geb, Earth Father!
Goose-crowned Great Cackler,
You laughed creation alive
and strewed Your joy into every living creature
that moves within Your embrace.

Hail to You, Geb, Earth Father!
First king of mankind,
You passed to us Your sovereignty
and all the weight and power of authority
so that Your seeds might bloom in Your image.

Hail to You, Geb, Earth Father!
Source of all offerings,
Your bounty surpasses all wealth,
flowering with richness and growth
as You bless mortals and gods alike.

Hail to You, Geb, Earth Father!

This post brought to you by the Pagan Blog Project.

2013’s first E post was Enoughness.
2012’s first E post was Extinct Totems.

Treading the Fishes

Treading the Fishes

I took a bit of catfish from my partner’s dinner plate and squirreled it away with a piece of crabcake from my own meal, wrapping them both in a napkin and tucking it into my shirt pocket. When he didn’t bat an eye or remark on my seafood hoarding, I laughed. “It’s for Treading the Fishes,” I told him, and he made the ohhh of recognition. For a non-Kemetic, he’s pretty savvy.

Treading the Fishes is a multi-day festival that celebrates recurring fertility and kingship; lasting from III Shomu 19 (Monday) to III Shomu 23 (Friday), it involves the king treading on dried fish, hence the name. Stomping the fish is symbolic of conquering isfet (uncreation), but also ties into the cyclical fertility of the land, as the fish are buried to provide nutrients to the soil for the next growing season. The king would also re-dedicate herself to her nation of Kemet and offer the Heqa sceptor, a symbol of rulership, to Khnum, the Netjeru Who makes the each human on His potter’s wheel.

So I took my tiny bit of fishes out to our little garden-like section near the front door and dug a shallow pit, then tucked the food, now wrapped inside a folded paper, into the soil. I covered the packet with fresh dirt, watered it with pure water (to help the paper start decomposing), and gave it a good couple stomps; I am certainly no king or representative of one, but I am happy to participate in symbolically refertilizing the earth and helping ensure the next good growing season. The act of setting aside some bounty to fuel and welcome the next surge of abundance feels very important to me, not to mention useful and applicable in many different areas of life.

On the paper that held the now-dried fish, I had written a little heka:

As the land provides for me,
so I provide for the land in what ways I can;
as Netjer provides for me,
so I offer to Netjer in what ways I can.
I give back part of what I receive
to open the way for abundance.
Dua Wesir and Set, Who dance the cycle
of green growth and fallow rest,
both equal in the eyes of Ma’at!
Dua Geb, Who encompasses both crest and trough,
Who makes us mortals live with His gifts!